Friday, July 23, 2010



1E Migration Tool

The Migration of Package and Program details along with source files
Renaming of Package and Program names during migration
Direct transfer of packages from your SMS site to ConfigMgr
Export to flat file structure from SMS site and Import into ConfigMgr from flat file
Exporting of SMSNomad command line settings to new ConfigMgr Nomad tab settings



ConfigMgr Site Bound Tool

SiteBound.exe /s {central site server} /file {excel file} /log {path}

/s Central Site Server name.
/file Path to Excel files.
/log Log file path.

Download it from

ConfigMgr 2007 CCR creator tool

Run the Create_and_copy.bat file and it will

1. Create a folder on the c drive called CCRBIN
2. Copy the IPF and Machines.cvs files to the CCRBin folder

Then it will ask you to compile the IPF with SMS installer.

Then to run it use these directions

1. Add the machines that you want CCR's created for to the Machine.cvs file (it can be 1 or many)
2. Execute the EXE
3. It will prompt you for your ConfigMgr Server
4. Then it will prompt you for your ConfigMgr Site code
(This info can be hardcoded just follow directions in the IPF to do that)

---Created by: Chris Stauffer download

ConfigMgr Branch DP Add

This tool was written in C# and requires the .NET framework 2.0 Running the tool
BDPAdd.exe /s {central site server} /file {excel file} /log {path}
/s Central Site Server name. /file Path to Excel files. /log Log file path.

download it from

Preload Package Tool for Configuration Manager 2007

Problem Scenarios:

  1. When software distribution packages are created, information about them is sent to child sites in the hierarchy. If a child site has a distribution point installed that is listed in the package properties to host the content, the content is transferred over the network and uses available network bandwidth sending compressed copies of all required package source files. To avoid using network bandwidth, the Preload Package Tool can be used to copy compressed software distribution package source files to the remote child site before assigning the child site distribution point to host the package source files.
  2. If a child site fails that has a distribution point that is assigned to host software distribution package source files for a package created at a site higher in the hierarchy, all package source files will be resent over the network when the site is rebuilt and rejoined to the site hierarchy. To avoid this, the Preload Package Tool can be used to restore backed up compressed software distribution package source (.pck) files to the distribution point before rejoining the site to the hierarchy so they will already be present.

  1. Copy PreloadPkgOnSite.exe file to the .\program files installation directory\bin\i386 directory on the child site that you wish to preload compressed software distribution package source (.pck) files.
  2. Copy the applicable .pck files from the parent site or from a backup location to the distribution point share on the child site manually. After manually copying the files, ensure that the read-only NTFS file attribute for the .pck file is set.
  3. From a command prompt, run the tool using the following syntax: PreloadPkgOnSite.exe PkgID StoredPkgVersion.
  4. Running this command will update necessary software distribution package source location information for the site and forward this information up the hierarchy.
  5. After the package source file location information is sent up the hierarchy, the distribution point hosting the manually copied .pck files can be added to software distribution package source locations at without the need to transfer package source files over the network.

  1. The command line usage is: PreloadPkgOnSite.exe PkgID StoredPkgVersion
  2. If software package information already exists for a package at the site where the tool is used, the tool cannot be used.
  3. This tool is meant only for child sites and cannot be used to preload packages that were created at the child site where the tool is run.
  4. The PkgID.pck file must exist at the child site before the tool is run.

  • When run, this tool modifies site database information at all sites higher in the hierarchy. This tool should only be run on fully functioning child sites and only when necessary.
  • If the Configuration Manager 2007 distribution manager process has already started processing software distribution package information to be preloaded, there is no need to run the tool


Download it from here:

Monday, July 19, 2010

Day to Day Operations SCCM / ConfigMgr 2007 Reports

I recommend below ConfigMgr Reports to be familiar and these might be useful in day to day operations


Asset Intelligence:-

License 03A - Count of licenses by license status
Hardware 07A - USB devices by manufacturer


Software 02C - Software by Category and Family


Software 01A - Summary of installed software in a specific collection

This report provides a summary of installed software ordered by the number of instances found from inventory.


Desired Configuration Management – Compliance

Summary compliance for a collection by computer


Count physical disk configurations

Computers with low free disk space (less than specified MB free)

Computers with low free disk space (less than specified % free)

Count memory configurations

Computers with low memory (less than or equal to specified MB)

Computers with a specific amount of memory

Memory information for a specific computer


Count IP addresses by subnet

IP - Information for a specific computer


List of NAP-capable and NAP-upgradable computers

List of Network Access Protection policies

Operating System

Windows Server computers

Computers with a specific operating system and service pack

Computers with a specific operating system

Count operating systems and service packs

Count operating system versions

Services - Computers running a specific service


Count SMS client versions

Servers with no client Installed

Client Deployment Failure Report

Client Deployment Success Report

Client Deployment Status Details

Client Assignment Failure Details

Count clients assigned and installed for each site

Computers with a specific SMS client version

Count clients for each site

Computers with duplicate MAC addresses

Computers that may share the same SMS Unique ID

Clients that have not reported recently (Collection)

& Clients that have not reported recently (in a specified number of days)


Site TO Site Reports:

Sites by hierarchy with time of last site status update


Computers in a specific site
Status messages for a branch distribution point
Site system roles and servers for a specific site

Software Inventory

Software registered in Add Remove Programs for a specific collection
Computers with specific software registered in Add Remove Programs
Computers with a specific product
Count of all instances of software registered with Add or Remove Programs
Computers with a specific product name and version
Count computers with a specific filename

Software Distribution:-

Status of a specific advertisement
All advertisements for a specific collection
All advertisements
Distribution status of a specific package
All packages on a specific distribution point
All distribution points
All active package distributions



Compliance 1 - Overall Compliance
Compliance 4 - Deployment (per update)
Compliance 3 - Update list (per update)
Compliance 4 - Deployment (per update)
Management 1 - Updates required but not deployed
Management 2 - Updates in a deployment
States 1 - Enforcement states for a deployment
States 2 - Evaluation states for a deployment
Scan 1 - Last scan states by collection
Scan 2 - Last scan states by site


All audit messages for a specific user
All Task Sequence Advertisements
Deployment status of all task sequence advertisements
Progress of a running task sequence
Progress of OS deployment task sequences
Status of all unknown computers
Computers for a specific user name

All sites that are enabled for Wake On LAN
All computers targeted for Wake On LAN activity
All objects pending wake-up activitiy

Customized reports:

All computers based on AD site:




FROM v_R_System SYS

WHERE SYS.AD_Site_Name0 LIKE @variable

ORDER BY SYS.AD_Site_Name0, SYS.Name0

--Prompt Query





FROM v_R_System SYS

WHERE SYS.AD_Site_Name0 LIKE @variable

ORDER BY SYS.AD_Site_Name0, SYS.Name0

Lins with reports =รจ Hardware - General - Computer information for a specific computer; below is the screenshot


Also I prefer one to have below custom reports

Compliance - Detailed list - specific collection

Computer Information - specific collection

Computer information for a collection of computers

Computers with specific software

Distribution Points in All DP Group

Missing Patches

Network settings

Network settings for a specific collection

Servers with SCCM Client version
All Workstation Patching compliance reports
All Desktops & Laptops model & make reports

Reg Hack for SMS Installer 2.0

Reg Hack for SMS Installer 2.0



' Primary Server: 00000001
' Workstation: 00000004



save it to a txt file and add this, then you can install the software

Sunday, July 18, 2010

Learn More About Intel vPro Technology

  • Getting Started
  • Management Consoles
  • Technologies
  • Use Cases
  • wds.txt

    Option 60: "PXEClient"
    Option 66: "2k3-wds.domain.local"
    Option 67: "boot\x86\"

    sysprep -mini -quiet -factory -reboot
    c:\windows\system32\sysprep\sysprep.exe /quiet /generalize /shutdown /oobe

    Wednesday, July 14, 2010

    TechNet Virtual Labs: System Center

    TechNet Virtual Labs: System Center

    Application Virtualization
    Configuration Manager and Systems Management Server


    Data Protection Manager


    Operations Manager


    System Center Service Manager
    Systems Center Essentials (SCE)

    2k8 r2 --113 373 816 testing

    Test post

    Monday, July 12, 2010

    DP Pros and Cons


    · Content on demand

    · Uses bits to get content


    · SCCM client breaks so does the DP

    · Requires an unprotected DP to get content

    · Less robust reporting than a secondary site.

    DP PROS:

    · Senders

    · Better reporting

    · No need for unprotected parent DP

    DP CONS:

    · No content on demand

    · Uses SMB to get content

    Sunday, July 11, 2010

    System Center Family

    Below are the Microsoft System Center product alignment



    Tuesday, July 6, 2010

    The following WMI namespaces are created by SMS 2003:

    The following WMI namespaces are created by SMS 2003:

    • root\ccm

    • root\CCM\VulnerabilityAssessment

    • root\CCM\Events

    • root\CCM\invagt

    • root\CCM\SoftMgmtAgent

    • root\CCM\LocationServices

    • root\CCM\DataTransferService

    • root\CCM\Messaging

    • root\CCM\Policy

    • root\CCM\SoftwareMeteringAgent

    • root\CCM\ContentTransferManager

    • root\CCM\Scheduler

    • root\cimv2\sms

    • root\SmsDm

    • root\sms

    • root\sms\inv_schema

    • root\sms\site_<sitecode>

    Sunday, July 4, 2010

    Troubleshooting WinPE and task sequence issues

    You can troubleshoot some common WinPE and task sequence issues.

    WinPE never starts the task sequence

    Check the SMSTS.LOG file at X:\windows\temp\smstslog\smsts.log. If a package never downloaded, it is likely that you simply do not have the appropriate network drivers installed, which prevents the machine from communicating with Configuration Manager.

    Check your driver catalog to ensure you have the right network drivers available and installed into the boot image, and update the boot image to your distribution points.

    Additional network or storage drivers might be needed in the boot image to enable the WinPE boot to function correctly. You should add those through Drivers in the Operating System Deployment node.

    The right drivers have been added to the boot image, but are not loading

    The original boot.wim file (WinPE boot image) created during Configuration Manager installation is copied and modified with IBM-specific drivers and other files. Your task sequences that use the IBM Deployment Pack must use this boot image or the tools might not work properly.

    Check to make sure the image into which you loaded the drivers is the same image being used by the task sequence.

    This is a common error for administrators who maintain multiple boot images.

    Servers will not boot using PXE

    PXE is an extension of DHCP, which uses a broadcast type of communication. Broadcast communication uses standard timeout values that are not readily changeable. As a result, a computer waits for a default timeframe to receive a DHCP or PXE response before timing out and causing a failure condition.

    Each time a server is rebooted, it must renegotiate the connection to the switch. Some network switches arrive configured with default settings that might incur connectivity delays. That is, the settings on the switch might cause a DHCP or PXE timeout because they fail to negotiate a connection in time.

    One of the features that can be affected by this issue is Spanning Tree Protocol (STP). STP is a protocol that prevents loops and provides redundancy within a network. A networking device using this algorithm might experience some latency as it collects information about other network devices. During this period of information collection, servers might boot to PXE and time out while waiting for a response from Windows® Deployment Services. Disable the STP or enable PortFast on end-node ports for the target server to prevent such occurrences. Refer to the manufacturer’s user guide for further information.

    Another feature that can be affected by this issue is the EtherChannel or Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP). EtherChannel allows multiple links between devices to act as one fast link that shares the load between the links. Running the EtherChannel Protocol in automatic mode can cause a connectivity delay of up to 15 seconds. Switch to a manual mode or turn off this feature to eliminate this delay.

    Speed and duplex negotiation can also play a role in negotiation timeouts. If auto-negotiation on the switch is set to off, and the server is not configured to that speed and duplex setting, the switch will not negotiate with that server.

    For more information, see the Cisco Web site and the following Cisco documents:

    Default boot order does not allow PXE to boot when a valid drive exists

    When an active partition is created on a hard drive, it automatically becomes a bootable device if a valid operating system has been installed. If your PXE NIC is after the hard drive in the boot order, the hard drive tries to boot before PXE and boots to Windows, or causes an Invalid System Partition error if Windows is not installed.

    To resolve this issue, be sure that PXE is placed before the hard drive in the boot order. Keep in mind that even if PXE is first in the boot order, the computer does not actually boot to PXE unless Configuration Manager has a task sequence for it to run.

    When using a “Reboot” action after initializing an array controller, the task sequence fails

    Configuration Manager 2007 does not allow a task sequence to reboot back to PXE. It can reboot back to WinPE or to an installed operating system, both of which require a disk partition and the appropriate installed software.

    Without a disk partition, Configuration Manager will fail when attempting to reboot during a task sequence because it expects to copy WinPE to the disk. Additionally, the management point tracks when a machine has booted to PXE to run a task sequence, and once a machine has booted to PXE for a task sequence, it cannot use PXE as a boot method again for that task sequence unless the advertisement is reset.

    To perform a reboot to PXE if you need to within a task sequence, use the custom action called “Reboot To PXE." This custom action, written using C# and VBScript, connects to the Configuration Manager 2007 SDK, and contains custom code to drive actions in the admin console as well as the machine being deployed. This custom action performs all the steps necessary to perform the reboot to PXE and allow for proper program flow when it occurs.

    The only other way to accomplish a reboot to PXE is to use more than one task sequence, let the computer “fall off the end” of the first task sequence and manually reset the PXE advertisement for the computer.

    Task sequence fails with “Failed to Download Policy” and code 0x80093102 or 0x80004005

    This error code typically refers to a certificate validation issue.

    The SMSTS.LOG file will show an entry with the following text:

    CryptDecryptMessage ( &DecryptParams, pbEncrypted, 
    nEncryptedSize, 0, &nPlainSize, 0 ), HRESULT=80093102


    no cert available for policy decoding

    Possible causes are:

    • Misconfiguration of your domain or a site server, such as DNS not pointing to the site server, or the site server not specifying a valid FQDN (which is referred to by the DNS listing).

      If your site server does not specify a FQDN (and only specifies the NETBIOS name), and your DNS server refers to the FQDN, a faulty lookup might cause this error.

    • The certificate being used for PXE and boot media.

      Check the certificates under the Site Settings node and see if any certificates are blocked or missing. Open the certificates and ensure that they are actually installed into the certificate store. If not, install them.

    If these actions do not work, try removing the package from the distribution point (via Manage Distribution Points) and adding the package again to regenerate the package hash.

    Task sequence fails with “Failed to Download Policy” and code 0x80004005

    This error code typically refers to a certificate validation issue.

    The SMSTS.LOG file will show an entry with the following text:

    failed to download policy

    Check the certificates under the Site Settings node to if any certificates are blocked or missing. Open the certificates to ensure that the certificates are installed into the certificate store. If not, install the certificates.

    Task sequence fails because the package is not downloading

    In WinPE, the default option of “Download content locally when needed by running task sequence” will not work. When in WinPE, the task sequence engine will ignore (and fail) all actions that have packages set for this option.

    Set all packages needed for use in WinPE to “Access content directly from a distribution point when needed by the running task sequence.”

    Task sequence does not run again even after clearing the PXE advertisement

    You must set the advertisement to “Always rerun” so that any time you reset the PXE advertisement, the advertisement is applied to the computer regardless of whether it ran the task sequence before.

    Task sequences fail or act incorrectly after an upgrade

    When upgrading from a previous version of this product, existing task sequences using these custom actions are not automatically updated.

    To function correctly, open each task sequence action that uses a custom action in an editor. Add a “.” to the description and remove it to enable the Apply button. Click Apply to refresh the properties of the custom action and save any new automatic data or formatting that is required to function with the new version.

    Files and logs are not being returned from the client

    A number of issues can prevent the task sequence from returning files or logs from the client.

    Among the possible issues that might prevent the task sequence from returning files or logs from the client are:

    • Failure of the client-side script prior to the file copy, which is usually evident in the log file.

      Repeat the task and press F8 during the task to get to a command prompt, if you selected the check box for Enable command support on the boot image properties > Windows PE page.

      Then open the SMSTS.LOG file. The location varies. In WinPE via PXE, the location is at X:\Windows\Temp\Smstslog\smsts.log.

    • Malformed XML in the IBM Deployment Packconfiguration file.
    • The command being executed actually has an error but exits with code 0.

      This can occur when a severe error is encountered in the script while the script is set to ignore errors and use programmatic error handling. Then the error handling did not catch the same error.

      Report such issues to the IBM® support site, as described in Getting help and technical assistance.

    • The task sequence cannot access the share or mapped drive that is the target drive for copying the files or logs.

    Logs are being returned but not output files

    A number of issues can prevent the task sequence from returning output files while allowing the task sequence to return log files.

    Among the possible issues that might prevent the task sequence from returning output files from the client are:

    • No return file parameters are specified in the configuration XML.
    • Return file parameters in the configuration XML are incorrect.
    • An error is occurring with the operation of the utility that generates the output file.
    • A null variable is causing an error in the file name of the file to be returned.

    Task step execution does not automatically change after a change to the configuration XML file

    If you change the configuration XML, previously existing task steps do not automatically change unless you edit them.

    To fix the existing task steps, open the task sequence editor and make a minor edit to each custom action step in the sequence. You can simply add a “.” to the description and then delete it to enable the Apply button. Click Apply. The task sequence steps are now saved with the automatically updated information from the new XML file.

    Task sequence fails at “Apply Operating System” with “Failed to make volume X:\ bootable”

    Several problems can cause this error.

    This issue is indicated by log content similar to the following text:

    MakeVolumeBootable( pszVolume ), 

    Failed to make volume E:\ bootable.
    Please ensure that you have set an active partition on the boot
    disk before installing the operating system.

    Unspecified error (Error: 80004005; Source: Windows)


    Process completed with exit code 2147500037

    This issue can be related to two different scenarios:

    • If you are using a Format & Partition action in your task sequence to partition the hard drives, make sure that you select the check box for Make this the boot partition on one of the partitions.

      If you do not make a drive bootable and the computer has only the single drive, the task sequence engine automatically makes one of the partitions the boot partition. But if there are multiple drives, the task sequence engine cannot determine which drive should be bootable, and you see this error.

    • If you upgraded from the Configuration Manager RTM to SP1, you might have a problem if both hard drives are completely raw. If you have never partitioned the drives, a known bug in Windows PE prevents Windows PE from determining the drive where it was booted, and you see this error.

      This situation is likely on a server with a RAID controller where you have just formed two or more RAID sets. The new RAID sets are completely raw because they have never existed before.

      The only workaround to the problem of multiple raw drives is to manually boot into Windows PE and run "diskpart" to partition at least one of the drives. Then run the task sequence again. The task sequence should work.

      The known problem with Windows PE is fixed in Windows Vista SP1 and hence in the Windows PE that is derived from Vista SP1.

    Install Configuration Manager 2007 SP1
    Configuration Manager 2007 SP1 includes the SP1 version of the Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK). Download and install Configuration Manager SP1 to get the new version.

    Upgrading to Configuration Manager 2007 SP1 automatically updates your default boot images, but does not automatically upgrade the IBM boot images.

    Upgrade the IBM boot images by rerunning the IBM Deployment Pack installer and selecting “Modify”. You must also update your distribution points so that the new images are used. You should also update the distribution points for the default boot images as well.

    The product installer detects the version of WinPE that is currently in use by the default boot images. If the default boot images are not Vista SP1, the product cannot install.

    How to tell if your boot images are upgraded to Vista SP1
    Boot image properties contain an identifier for “OS Version.”

    Perform this procedure to see the version of WinPE in your boot images:

    1. Click Computer ManagementOperating System DeploymentBoot ImagesIBM Deployment.
    2. Right-click the boot image and select Properties.
    3. Click Images.
    4. Check the OS Version property for a value of 6.0.6001.18000 or greater.

    What to do if your boot images are not upgraded to Vista SP1
    You can manually recreate your boot images using the Windows AIK and following the steps listed in Technet: How to Add a Boot Image to Configuration Manager.

    If your Configuration Manager processes permit, you might find it easier to remove the old boot image packages using the Admin Console, delete the files in the OSD\boot directories, and rerun the SP1 upgrade installation.

    How to tell if WAIK was upgraded to Vista SP1

    1. Click Start > Run; then run the Regedit command.
    2. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ComponentStudio.
    3. There should be a single key under this key, which is named with the number of the Windows AIK version.

      Note: Only one version of Windows AIK can be installed. However, an uninstall operation might have failed to remove the registry key.

      In such a case, the registry key with the highest version number should be the correct version number.

    What to do if Windows AIK was not upgraded to Vista SP1
    Configuration Manager is supposed to automatically upgrade the Windows AIK version during an upgrade to Configuration Manager SP1. If that did not occur, try manually uninstalling Windows AIK and rerunning the Configuration Manager SP1 upgrade.

    To download Windows AIK, see the Microsoft Download Center: AIK page.

    System environment variables are not carried over to the next action in the task sequence

    When a task sequence runs, commands run in a command shell. When the task ends, so does the command shell environment, which causes the loss of any system variables that are defined in the task.

    To pass variables between tasks, set the variables as “Task Sequence variables,” “Collection variables,” or “Machine variables.”

    IBM Link :P

    one other link

    SYSPREP for 2k3

    When working with Virtual Machines, Sysprep is a real timesaver. You can, on a virtual machine, install several configurations of servers (SMS 2003, SQL or SCCM or vNext, etc), sysprep the images, and then have these pre-configured images ready to deploy to a VPC or any Vcenter  installation when needed, by just copying the appropriate VHD file over and associating it with a new VM.

    In order to run Sysprep, you first need to install it. You can get a hold of Sysprep in two ways: it is on the \Support\Tools\ file on the Windows Server installation media, or you can download it from here. Once you get a hold of the file, you should extract the contents to a directory on your HD, for example c:\Deploy.


    This directory contains several useful tools, and you should definitely read the deploy.chm file for instructions and details on the process. There are two files that are of particular importance to the process: sysprep.exe and setupmgr.exe.

    For sysprep to work completely automated, it requires an answer file, called sysprep.inf. This answer file contains the “answers” to all the questions asked by the Windows installer during the setup process. The answer file can be created manually with any text editor, but fortunately there is a nice wizard-like tool that can help you generate this file. This tool is the setupmgr.exe program:


    This program allows you to generate the sysprep.inf file by presenting you the options and letting you enter the default answer. In order to fully automate an installation, follow these steps on the Setup Manager:

    1. Click Next on the Welcome screen
    2. Select “Create new” and click “Next”
    3. Select “Sysprep setup” and click “Next”:
    4. Select the type of system you’re going to sysprep, and click “Next”
    5. Select “Yes, fully automate the installation” and click “Next”
    6. Now you need to fill in all the information required to complete the process:

    Once you complete the execution of the Setup Manager, it creates a new directory in the root of the system drive called sysprep. This directory contains all the information necessary for the Sysprep tool to execute.


    Now you need to execute the Sysprep tool, sysprep.exe:

    In this tool:

    1. Click “OK” on the warning dialog that appears when running the tool.
    2. Select “Don’t reset grace period for activation”
    3. Set the “Shutdown mode” to “Shut down”
    4. Click on Reseal. That will leave the image ready for copying.

    Once the image is copied, you can just configure a new virtual machine with the new image, and start it up. The last portion of the Windows setup process will execute:

    After a little while (<10min), the machine will reboot, and the process will be completed. You now have a brand new sysprep’d and cloned server up and running!!


    for more info


    For Windows XP SP3 :-


    Step #1

    The first step is to download the Sysprep App which is included in the CAB file for Windows XP Service Pack 3 Deployment Tools. (Download Sysprep Tool)

    Step #2

    Next go to the PC you are going to be sysprepping and create a folder on the root of the C: drive called sysprep.

    Step #3

    Next you will need to extract the contents of the file you downloaded in Step #1 to the sysprep folder on the root of the C: drive.

    Step #4

    Now we are going to run the sysprep Setup Manager. Double click on setupmgr.exe.

    Sysprep Setup Manager

    Sysprep Setup Manager

    Step #5

    Click Next and it is going to ask you whether you want to modify an existing Answer File or create a new one. We are wanting to create a new one, so again click next.

    Sysprep - New or Existing Answer File

    Sysprep - New or Existing Answer File

    Step #6

    You now have three options: Unattended Setup, Sysprep Setup, or Remote Installation Services (RIS). In this example we are going to select the Sysprep setup option and then click next. (This creates a sysprep.inf file)

    Sysprep - Sysprep.inf File

    Sysprep - Sysprep.inf File

    Step #7

    Select Windows XP Professional and click next. (This will also work on Windows XP Home, Windows Server 2003 Standard, Web, and Enterprise.)

    Sysprep - Windows XP Professional

    Sysprep - Windows XP Professional

    Step #8

    In this step it is asking you if you want to fully automate the installation. That is up to you, either way works fine. In this example I will be using the “No, do not fully automate the installation.”

    Sysprep - Fully Automate or Not?

    Sysprep - Fully Automate or Not?

    Step #9

    Now we are at the configuration page. There is a lot in here so I am not going to go into detail. In fact, you don’t even need to input anything here for the sysprep to just work. However, everything you input in here will save you time and help shape your image.

    Sysprep - Configuration Page

    Sysprep - Configuration Page

    Step #10

    Once you are all done, you should be at the bottom and selected on “Identification String”; click Finish and it is going to prompt you for a location to create and save the sysprep.inf file. The default location is fine, as it will need to be within that sysprep folder on your C: drive. Once you hit ok you will then need to click “Cancel”. There is no close button.

    Sysprep - Saving the Sysprep.inf File

    Sysprep - Saving the Sysprep.inf File

    Step #11

    Now you should verify the sysprep.inf file by double clicking on it and opening it up with Notepad.

    Sysprep - Verifying the Sysprep.inf File

    Sysprep - Verifying the Sysprep.inf File

    Step #12

    There were a few changes with Windows XP Service Pack 3 and sysprep. The administrator’s profile is no longer copied over to the default profile. You will need to add a line within the sysprep.inf file to regain this important function. Under the InstallFilesPath section add this:


    Once done, hit save.

    Sysprep - Adding line to sysprep.inf so the administrator profile will copy over to default profile

    Sysprep - Adding line to sysprep.inf so the administrator profile will copy over to default profile

    Step #13

    Now you are ready to start the sysprep, reboot, and capture your sysprepped image. Double click on the sysprep.exe and then select the following three options in order: Use Mini-Setup, Shutdown Mode: Reboot, and click Reseal. Make sure you have your media ready to capture your image. If you reboot fully without booting to your capturing software it will ruin the sysprep and you will have to redo the sysprep.

    Sysprep - Preparation Tool 2.0

    Sysprep - Preparation Tool 2.0

  • Sysprep will now get rid of any machine specific identifiers and shutdown the computer.
  • The hard disk is now ready to be imaged.  You can at this stage use tools such as Ghost or boot using your WinPE CD and capture the image to a WIM file.
  • Deploy your image to a computer and restart it.
  • If you start the new computer using the newly deployed image, sysprep will now setup Windows according to the settings in sysprep.inf.

    For Windows Vista / 7 / 2008


    Type this command with administrative privileges in command prompt


    c:\windows\system32\sysprep\sysprep.exe /quiet /generalize /shutdown /oobe


    The experience is also streamlined considerably. Simply run sysprep.exe above and you are presented with:


    Check the “Generalize” checkbox (regenerates system SID), change the Shutdown Options to “Shutdown”, and click OK. The system will go through the sysprep process and shut itself down.


    Using Your SysPrep’d Image to Create a New Virtual Machine

    Now, creating a new virtual machine will only take just a couple minutes.

    1. First, you need to copy your SysPrep’d image to a new name and to a new location where you will use this new virtual machine.  Copy your SysPrep’d image files (.vmc & .vhd) to a new location where you want your new virtual machine file to reside.
    2. Rename them to a new, appropriate name.  For example, if you are going to create a SharePoint server you might name them something like:
      1. MySharePoint2007.vmc
      2. MySharePoint2007.vhd
    3. Add this new virtual machine to you Virtual PC or Virtual Server; which ever you are using;
    4. Edit the configuration and make sure the virtual hard drive (VHD) is pointing to your new .vhd file.  In this example, the MySharePoint2007.vhd file.
    5. Configure any other items such as memory allocation and network cards as necessary.
    6. Start the virtual machine.
    7. You will receive a few prompts such as the name for you new machine.
    8. If you wish, you can now join you virtual machine to a domain.

    SysPrep is a must have time-saving tool for anyone who uses Virtual PC and/or Virtual Server.